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about him and prayed for him all the years in prison. while the american civil rights movement was going on here in this country and here in los angeles. he came to visit the first ame churn only a few months after he was released from prison in south africa. they have pictures of him on the walls inside. it was a big moment for them here. we did get a chance earlier today to speak to one of the parishioners about meeting nelson mandela. >> i'll always remember that. what a blessing to meet this gentle man. more than anything in life, the one that taught us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive, but he told us to forgive. it's the most important asset of our life, to forgive and move on, yes. he is my hero. he is my papa. >> reporter: as you can tell, she, too, was born in aftrica bt been here for 27 years. they're remembering nelson mandela here today but remember him at the first ame church virtually forever. richelle. >> can you talk more about the special connection this church teams to nelson mandela? >> reporter: it's because he came here. his grandsons came her
, almost like he was interviewing me about american politics and the civil rights movement. because in south africa, the majority of the population is black. he wanted to know, wait, how did a minority in the united states achieve civil rights? we ended up talking about, and he's fascinating with the founding fathers. the idea that george washington gives up power one term. something mandela later does. but also citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states. remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. in a sense, we were inspiring too nelson mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything when you sat down with him that really surpriseded you? i'm sure you prepared ahead of time and researched them and got to know the man through what you were able to read and hear from other personal anecdotes. what did you take away from it? >> i think the thing that surprised me the most is i was saying, you know, mr. mandela, you are a beacon to the world in terms of freedom, struggle, the sacrifice, the 27 years in jail, standing up for principle. he started l
of the bar a civil rights attorney at payer. thank you so much for joining me now first i wasn't talking about how you get your name on that less is the real bonafide way that the light that will tell them you're on that list while the government doesn't reveal officially to people whether they are on the list an anti black greasy usually happen is that a federal law enforcement agency. make little pro. not many people including us citizens to the watch list and then never revealed the reason for being included on the watch list or even officially let them know that they are on the list and there's just not really any sure fire way of these people finding out why they ended up on the list in the first weeks and i understand a muslim sounding names are more likely to be on that once was. because they are credible dress or that because it's more of a stereotype. while there's no reason to believe that just because somebody has a muslim name or muslim sounding name that they are more likely to be a threat in any kind of way. ahmed and the experience of the civil rights legal community we ar
politics and the american civil rights movement. in south africisa the majority the population is black and hert white. he wanted to know how did a minority end up achieving civilh rights. he's fasecinated with the founding fathers. it's something mandela also does. but also, citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states.uth remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. so we were inspiring to nelson t mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything that really surprised you? i'm sure you prepare add head of time and researched him and gota to know the man through what you were able to read and hear through other personal ane anecdotes. >> i said you are a beacon to the world in terms of the sacrifice and 27 years in jail. standing up for principal: he started laughing. i was taken aback. i thought he's not understanding this american guy, you know? but he said no.wa it's when he was growing up all he wanted to do was rebel against his parents. hewa wanted to get out of the b tribal situation. he was like a prince and go to the big city of johannesburg.
thurners candles and stood with others praying for the civil rights leader. there were scenes like this across sfrikdz today. more now from al jazeera nick schifrin. >> nelson mandela talked about a rainbo nation. his struggle wasn't on behalf of black south africans but on behalf of all segregated and humiliated by racist rulers. >> nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. citizens of all races and religion say mandela created that had unity. at an interfaith service, south africans celebrated the respect that mandela provided them. >> celebrate. it's an important model for human society. >> it lions us to be. >> down the road at an indian rally, man dela was thanked on behalf of children. 20 years ago, perussia was a second-class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks. >> we were part of the deprived lot. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to find something to eat. we had to say to the guy. sorry, do you sell to us? he would say, no we don't but you guys can go a
to the civil rights movement. now turning to sad news about one of the ultimate civil rights pioneers -- nelson mandela, an enduring world icon of peaceful resistance, has died mandela famously led south africa, out of apartheid. he spent 27 years in prison after being convicted by a white minority government. he was released in 19-90 and went on to became south africa's first black president in 1994. while in office, the economy nearly doubled. mandela died late yesterday. he was 95. friday is funday at first business. here to lighten the mood and enlighten us-- from the floor of cme group alan knuckman and scott shellady. they are ready to go for traders unplugged. good morning and topic number one: bears snared? corporate profits are at all time highs, stocks are sustaining near record levels-- are the bears growling? alan: my friend here is a market atheist.i know he doesn't believe. but if you look at the pe ratio at 19 and a half versus the record in 2000 was 26. we still have a long ways to go and the profits tell the story whether you like it or not. scott: i think that you have to real
luther king jr. and the country's civil rights and you were on south africa on the day mandela walked out of prison. tell us about that moment. >> you know, it was a moment difficult to describe. he took us on unbelievable heights of joy that day. and the depths of pain. a huge larger than life figure. i've gotten into south africa quite by chance in 1979 and connected with his family and we instructed in the 1990. and we had the feeling he would be released this weekend so my son and i met him there. what surprised me was he recognized me and call my name. he had seen the convention speech from the democratic convention. he came out and stopped. i'm sure the governor will say that he was unbelievably slumped. he came out not just reading speeches but up for debate. >> what do you think his enduring legacy will be around the world? is it the concept that i've heard you speak? the concept of forgiveness and reconciliation? >> i think it is the thing everybody says. that he was the true towering moral figure of our time. why do people say that he is the leader that they most respect? everyb
. this is a major civil rights case and nationally known after hurricane katrina. they thought they had closure. now they know that they don't. >> that has to be true of the glover team. we've just seen those pictures. bell he continue to see that. thank you. >> the obama administration said it has met it's deadline to fix the website. the administration promised all would be well in november. we will gather to the white house with more details, mike, this was a big deadline for the administration. are all the problems with the website solved? >> reporter: they aren't all solved but they say its like night and day after that disastrous launch of octobe october 1st. they cite certain benchmarks, certain metrics, error rates down to 1%. they were 6% at the outset of this debacle in the estimation of administration officials. as many as 800,000 a day and they achieved 90% functionality. you recall that by the end of last month, november 31st they had promised an 80% functionality. by their own estimation they have exceeded that. but that's by their own estimation. for the time being we'
to the pending federal civil rights lawsuit hi filed against the department, the department had also been conducting its own investigation. it says it uses data not profiling to fight crime. >> if you have a black chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager, that does not make sense in a prodetermine innocently african-american city. >> i know the department didn't do inning wrong. >> he initially agreed to participate in the program. because of the crime in the area, it is an aggressive approach, which focuses on targeting small crimes like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. six years ago it was the 13th most violent city, last year it drops. >> police must take any concerns about racial profiling very seriously. or lose trust. >> by abusing the rights you ail len nate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> disenchanted he has now dropped out of the zero tolerance program, as for sampson, he says he now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> al jazeera, miami gardens. >> the record setting streak on wall street is quickly fading
as director of the southern africa project of the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. douglas foster is the author of "after mandela: the struggle for freedom in post-apartheid south africa." he's an associate professor at northwestern university's medill school of journalism. donald gibb and john stremlau is vice president for peace programs at the carter center. he taught at the university of the witwatersrand in johannesburg. >> welcome to you mcdour first reaction tonight on hearing of the loss of nelson mandela? >> well, i'm terribly sad.of co. we knew it was coming. but nevertheless, it is a shock. and it's quite sad thing. i think first of all, the people of south africa who would be mourning in a very special way, but i think all around the world has lost a hero, a hero that we desperately needed, when he came forward and faif us hope. >> -- gave us hope. >> as we continue thisconversat. we do want to say to local stations that we are not going to be taking a break tonight so we can continue to discuss nelson mandela's life and legacy. and i want to pick up with you p
the american years of civil rights struggle, and in those years when he was in prison they felt a connection to him which was completed when he actually came here in 1990. so you can imagine what a wonderful moment that was for him. so it's a special thing for him. there is a service dedicated to nelson mandela at 10:00 ot here this morning. of course they will be remembering him all day and for many years to come. we spoke to the senior pastor here just a little while ago. >> it is awfully difficult to memorialize because a memorial would be life lock for all of us, for the next four, five generations. because a person of his character, a person of his statute and commitment -- stature, will have a clear record of what he's done and i think his life will be much larger and much more impactful, in ten, 15, 15, 20, 25, 30 years now as it has been in the last ten, 15 years. >> they tell me that the night nelson mandela was released from prison in south africa they prayed here at the church all night long and when they got the news that he was released the whole place broke out into cheers. >>
and the civil rights movement in the united states had many things in common. they did they actually today it's just a day of different sets of circumstances in the united states african americans why in the monarchy. anso it was a fraction of the population up saying that we wanted to acquire rights just as everyone else was in south africa eu yet the majority of black south africans who were old friends i mean argue whites so they aware there were some differences but there were some similarities in terms of segregation are and and and so all of those of the areas that had to be broken now. so while they are some similarities. the b two different types of movements ultimately getting rid of apartheid. in in a sense certainly is this the same is getting or use some left their similarities to getting rid of racism up the room throughout our world. o'neill is the fact that both him and ella had so much empathy mimi was ready to understand and appreciate the fifth of what some africans had evened out a piece way when we look at what he did in the sport's the renamed he rants and champion the ga
civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. .... they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back to the. we must address the federal mindset that values our rest rates. it is not because white kids in affluent suburbs are not also smoking pot, it is they tend to be arrested and do not have as good representation and the police gravitate there because it is easier. it has been going on for a long time. it is not a purposeful racism, but we have a racial return on the war on drugs that is not fair. minority communities are easy targets. some say that is good politics. maybe it
rights of all americans. in addition economic freedom, we have to have a 21st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights and prison reform. no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back. we must address the federal mindset that values arrest rates. >> if it were your could, would there be a chance to be rehabilitating them. it is a health problem and will not get better in prison. would you want to know that there might be other solutions? they should get back into society. they should be able to get a job. they shou
. because stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. getting women the right to vote, that was hard. making sure that workers have the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been easy for us to change how we do business. in this country. this has been the case for social security, medicare, for all the great social progress we have made in the country. >> however, greg are the young people buying it? because today, the harvard institute of politics released a poll saying that the young people, not always the most reliable voters, and confused in their views, it seems. the majority of them said today they disapproved of obama care and if given the chance, they would recall president obama. not vote for him today. >> i think the valuable lesson they have learned is cool doesn't reflect achievement, it masks incompetence. my niece had posters of justin bieber all over her room and suddenly they were gone. >> because your took them. >> i did. they're in my camper under the underpass. they could have listened to me. i'm like the camp counselor saying, don't p
hard. the civil rights movement was hard. giving me women the right to vo, that was hard. making sure we had the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been busy how we do business in this country. >> tony, the president has a wig problem. even with young people with startling statistics out of harvard, they came out with numbers. 39% of so-called millennials, 18 to 29-year-olds, only 39% approve of the affordable care act. 20%, just 20% of those polled intend to enroll. almost half do not intend to enroll. that could be bad news. >> mike, thank you ♪ >> mark morgan is here with the headlines in sports and big news for major college football. >> reporter: the prosecutor looking into sexual assault allegations against florida state quarterback jameis winston said that his investigation is complete, and he will announce his findings tomorrow afternoon. now william meggs said its up to prosecutors if there is enough evidence to charge winston and prosecutors have to decide if they charge is there a reasonable chance of conviction. that announcement is expected tomorrow. meanwhile
of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all now.e same boat what's going on in this town is that too often, the two parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the nemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have he sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common a common nd for sure destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. your don't work with party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll finish by recounting words that lyndon johnson, a master legislator, said once. e grew up poor in the hill country
, this couple. >> they filed a complaint. >> what happens now? >> the office of civil rights is going to look at that complaint and see if his civil rights were denied. by denying him the transplant, were they denying it because of his disability. if they find that he was, it's going to be a problem for the hospital. >> thanks so much. we'll be right back. across the country has brought me to the lovely city of boston. cheers. and seeing as it's such a historic city, i'm sure they'll appreciate that geico's been saving people money for over 75 years. oh... dear, i've dropped my tea into the boston harbor. huhh... i guess this party's over. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] aveeno® with soy helps reduce the look of brown spots in 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results. aveeno®. so when my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis them. was also on display, i'd had it. i finally had a serious talk with my dermatologist. this time, he prescrib
in charge. we saw that here in this country post-civil rights movement where -- there's a wonderful book i think about often about a small town and southern georgia, the civil rights movement came late to the county and those who sort of really were in opposition to the sheriff and ultimate power, how difficult, difficulty they had once they had any kind of power. and so i guess i wonder why, what happened? >> it's the big question in a place like this. obviously, people came back from 30 years in exile come in the case of the successor to nelson mandela in 1999. mostly living in london. and all of a sudden in charge of running a country that he didn't know that he left as a young man of 19, coming back and needing to run the place that was bankrupt the he described former president described walking into the office in union buildings after being sworn in and finding nothing. no computers, no pencils, no pins. no paper, and which to manage this developing country. so i think part of it is that that generation came back from exile to a country they did know. and that the presidency is in ha
inspiration from him during the civil rights days here in america, and they prayed for him and gave him their support all those years when he was in prison. and, of course, it was a big event here when only a few months after he got out of prison, he came to visit this church. it does beg the question how you memorialize this man in just one sermon. we spoke earlier to senior pastor j. edgar boyd? >> i he dismantled with the prison cell with the help of those here in america and other parts of the world, the giant, the you know grateful and the wronged giant of apartheid. he disassembled it and brought about hope, and it brought about liberation not only for himself but for peace-loving people throughout south africa. >> new mexico new mexico had been out of the public eye for many years before he died but there are parishioners here who met him and we spoke to one of them? >> what a blissing it meet in gentleman, more than anything in life, the one who told us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive. he told us to forgive. no forgive and move on. yes, et cetera my her
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
that person feeling the landscape. >> he clearly was a moral compass. for civil rights leaders here, how important was his passing? >> as president obama said, he was a leader for the world, and around the races world about apartheid and many things. he will be in the annals of martin luther king, gandhi, nelson mandela. >> and he was an inspiration to people all over the world in terms of what he stood for, and that is so important, and something that any of us should never forget -- that none of us should forget. >> on that note, an appropriate note, thank you, matthew dowd, and also eric bost. we will discuss nelson mandela's legacy with someone who knows it quite well. ceo mohamed el-erian will weigh in, as well as on the jo report that will be out in 15 minutes. stay "in the loop." we are just getting started on this friday. >> "in the loop" with betty liu will be right back. ♪ >> as we await the crucial employment report for the month of november, the last jobs to poorly with good this year, we're starting to see the -- jobs report we will get this up a whoppingre 28% this year,
? and the offensive rna mistweet with civil rights icon rosa parks declaring that she helped end racism. even though the rnc clarified the tweet, the firestorm continues. we'll speak with one of the people helping to lead the republicans' outreach to african-americans. face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] only aveeno® has an active naturals total soy formula that instantly brightens skin. and helps reduce the look of brown spots in just 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. try it for a month. then go ahead and try to spot a spot. aveeno® positively radiant. naturally beautiful results. of their type 2 diabetes with non-insulin victoza®. for a while, i took a pill to lower my blood sugar, but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza®. he said victoza® is different than pills. victoza® is proven to lower blood sugar and a1c. it's taken once-a-day, any time, and comes in a pen. and the needle is thin. victoza® is not for weight loss, but it may help you lose some weight. victoza® is an injectable prescription medicine that may improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 dia
programs that do not respect basic civil rights and civil liberties. we need to stay vigilant in our fight for respect in this country and that has been one of our themes. whether it's on the budget as our colleague, mr. scott, just talked about, or a plethora of bills that have been brought forward by individual members. an essential to the f.y. 2014 budget that has been worked on by the congressional black caucus, which reduces the budget and creates millions of jobs in a fair and balanced way. let me just close by talking about one final area, mr. speaker, that we as members of this body need to stay focused on and that's jobs and growing the economy. in my home state of nevada, we still have a stubbornly high unemployment rate above the national average. despite improvements in certain sectors, there's far too many nevadans who are still looking for work. many who have been out of work for now more than a year, year and a half, going on two years, and i know it's part of the budget debate that will occur between now and january 15, will be this discussion about extending unemployment b
include allegations that employees of the department deprived jail prisoners of civil rights, also obstruction of justice allegations. apparent attempts to cover up the truth after it became clear that cases were under investigation. some of the most outlandish alleged behavior started after it became known that an informant in the jail was working with the fbi. the u.s. attorney's office said employees of the sheriff's department went so far as to try to get a judge to release names of everybody involved in the investigation and when that didn't work, allegedly tried to put the squeeze on an fbi agent. >> despite a judge's refusal to issue this order because he had no jurisdiction over the federal agency, two los angeles county sheriff's deputies, sergeants, allegedly confronted an fbi special agent outside her residence in an attempt to intimidate her into providing details about the investigation. >> reporter: now, in the past, sheriff lee bacca has said it was the fbi who was breaking the law and said there was really no attempt to intimidate the fbi agent. it doesn't really so
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
or government defendants. thus attorneys' fees provisions are mostly found in civil right, environmental protection and other statutes. the provision in this bill differs from other congressional exceptions in that it would require anyone who loses a patent claim to pay the attorneys' fees of even large corporate defendants. this is a giant deterrent to genuine inventors from filing good-faith suits to defend their valid patents claims. therefore i urge the adoption of the watt-conyers substitute which would drop the losers pays provisions from the underlying bill while still including the key reforms that are present in the underlying bill and in the senate bill drafted by senate -- senator leahy. i urge adoption of the substitute and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from new york yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from california who has been a great person to work with on the judiciary committee and here on the floor of the house on this legis
itself has caused harms, particularly in civil rights-type cases. but where there is a private party that is alleged to have forgot the government, -- alleged to have ripped off the government, that is the false claims act. host: a few issues that the false claims act. i -- that the false claims act prohibits. host: that according to the justice department. we are talking to colette matzzie about the false claims act, some of its history, and some of its applications today. matthew is up next on our line for democrats. thanks for calling "washington journal." caller: i would like to ask about the whistleblower law. can it be used for the tarp and banks that are too big to fail and can it be used for iraq, afghanistan, and syria, the eu building that we did, and the $12 trillion deficit caused? guest: well, in that context, taking the war context first, there is -- you know, there have been more cases, there will continue to be more cases. it is likely there are cases under investigation. ae typical were case involves private defense contractor who has submitted a claim to the united
for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and then i will open up to the audience. we are in a transitional period for american defense strategy. are there lessons? thathat is a build down from lat summer of the pentagon. are there lessons in earlier periods in history that can help guide us now? >> what don't you answer that question. >> good afternoon everyone. it's wonderful to see so many familiar faces around the table. i do think there are some lessons to be learned from our history in terms of periods like this where we are coming out of a period of war and we a
was really sad. >> miami gardens police chief won't say much about sampson's case, due to the pending civil rights lawsuit filed against his department. the department has conducted it's own investigation since last year. the chief says the department uses data, not profiling, to fight crime. >> you got a black chief, african-american chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager. that does not make sense. a predominantly trick american city, i know the department didn't do anything wrong. >> it's an aggressive policing approach, focusing on small crime like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. the department's zero tolerance policing program is effective. miami gardens was the 15t 15th most violent city of its size, last year dropped to the 40th. >> police must take con terrence about racial profiling seriously or lose local trust i don't by abusing the rights of so many people systematically, you alienate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> dis enchanted, sampson now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> they have spent about $20,
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
up icing, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader said when he said, we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you would think they were from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not as foul citizens. we have interests in common. we've got to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. we forget we come from a common country with a common heritage, and for sure a common destiny. final thing i would say, and this is something that no labels is working to overcome, in this city today what all of you have to do every session in your state legislatures, forge principle compromised. the word cover my switchback in the day my father son used to be viewed as that's an act of statesmanship. today it is used as an act of betrayal. if you don't vote with your party, joe manchin was saying, 100% of the time, you are ostracized. there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv. so i'll just finish by recounting some word
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
a positive environment for civil society and to protect the rights of all ukrainians to express their views on the country's future in a constructive and peaceful manner. violence and intimidation should have no place in today's ukraine. to support the aspirations of the ukrainian people to achieve a prosperous european democracy. european integration is the surest course of economic growth and strengthening ukraine's democracy. thanks very much. >> here at the end of this briefing you can see it in its entirety on c-span that -- you can wor. live coverage here on c-span again now coming back at 5:00 p.m. eastern. we posted a question on our facebook page asking about your thoughts on congressional prod uctivity. a couple of responses. michael says, when you elect people who are contentious of government, you'll get that government. tracy offers the, hail hail term limits, hourly pay. congress has to me perks, and privileges. you can post your thoughts at, . coming up on c-span2, french opposition leader john prince walkup a -- will talk about his recent nuclear deal wit
to mandela. from the politicians to musicians to the art is to the right is to civil servants around the world really there is no other figo on the planet. since the advent of mobile communications who can match that of the week we've seen the likes of mind that i think in a way maybe we went to like him again in the sense of unity. we have a universal appeal. the flight but just as the fight against oppression. he encapsulated it in a way that few could do because of school. he gave twenty seven years of his life in jail for this and that he was prepared to give his entire life for this he did it. i'm having done that uncommon and coming out the other end. he had a mole flower tea that none of this good match said in a slumping to be free to blog about the bomb them in the new post the black us president. but the fact that mandela gave up so much to get what he gallops and to achieve what he achieved. i don't think it's easy to be called in our lifetime and that's why we've had this incredible outpouring around the world stops me from the moment it has been an incredible outpouring
holiday gift for the birther in your family. i can think of some. >>> up next, the political civil war. hoping new fights on the right may cost the republicans a couple of winnable senate seats. remember how that happened last night? you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. [ male announcer ] you've got to try red lobster's four course seafood feast, just 15.99. start with soup, salad and cheddar bay biscuits then choose one of eight entrees plus dessert! four perfect courses, just 15.99. come in to red lobster today and sea food differently. where their electricity comes from. they flip the switch-- and the light comes on. it's our job to make sure that it does. using natural gas this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there ar24/7.branches? i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drin
actually scrapped. this constitution is more emphasis that it's civil and more emphasis on people's freedoms and rights but many also feel that there is more power to the military which could mean less democracy. >> when the u.s. secretary of state john kerry was in cairo it was recognizing human rights more than democratic and what is the reaction to the way the constitution has now been shaped? >> we have already heard from americans regarding a new floor that was put in place and condemned it and said it had serious flaws and officials said the same thing and they call to the government to amendment. other provisions here that may find problematic. the u.s. is walking a delicate balance and doesn't want to interfere too much but also need to put enough pressure because many of the people expect them to do so when things are dipped to human rights violations and especially when it comes to the military getting more power. one thing we have to make clear is this referendum will be put to a vote and only if it's approved by the people the other steps and parliamentary elections an
. is he forced to make this apology by the north koreans? >>> plus, cnn on the front lines right now in syria's civil war. our own cnn crew gets rare access to one of the most brutal conflicts on the planet right now. there are seniors who have left hundreds of dollars of savings on the table by not choosing the right medicare d plan. no one could have left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors who compare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds of dollars. cvs/pharmacy wants to help you save on medicare expenses. talk to your cvs pharmacist, call, or go to to get your free, personalized plan comparison today. call, go online, or visit your local store today. millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, cont
and j.c. penney. we will be right back. >>darya: 545 right now grid of the civil war and today for the weather. hi erica. >>erica: today is the last day for mild and cool conditions. a cold blast is definitely heading our way. was it the live look from our mount tam cam. some areas of low clouds and. looks like a mix of sun and clouds for those of you in the south bay punter 7 day around the bay forecast a really highlights of those looks like we will hold on to this pattern as we head into the weekend but we will see sunny and clear afternoons. it will be chilly 3 of 547 is the time right now good morning george. >>george: not likely that we will see conditions quite as light as we saw last week. but we are off to a fairly good start here for your westbound the bay bridge. things are starting to back up a little in the cash lanes on the outside. but the rest of the ride looks good for your trip to the bay >>mark: the 49ers got wide receiver michael crabtree back against the rams and he promptly responded by making the longest catch by a niner wide out all season. there was som
's human rights chief has evidence that syrian government officials have committed crimes against humanity. she called on the international criminal court to open a probe into the civil war. she said responsibility for atrocities committed in the searing conflict extended to the top echelon of government, including president bashar al- assad. brewers started lobbying for a year unity lot. they are hope -- a beer unity law. in 1516, the bearberry and ruler decreed beer could only be made with water, malt, hops, and yeast and nothing else. there was relative calm on the streets of the thai capital after days of angry protests. police itrs and should can says the government took steps to calm a dangerous escalation of violence. police were ordered to stand back as demonstrators calling for the resignation of the to entert were allowed government compounds and tear down barricades outside of the police headquarters. i ask the business community and all people, including the protesters, to unite and reform our country under the king. the protestant leader insists the prime minister must resign
as a spoil of war, you helped return the art to its rightful owners. >> unique in the history of civilization. >> reporter: no country had ever done that before. >> they supervised the return of 5 million, 5 million stolen objects to the countries from which these things were taken. >> reporter: paintings were returned to museums. >> there it is. >> reporter: works you can see today. >> parc monceau. this claude monet painting is one at the new york metropolitan museum of art along with this van goyen landscape and soap bubbles. hitler wants this one. >> he wants the best of the best of the things he decides are the best. >> reporter: the nazis not only stole from museums but also from thousands of families. to recover the possessions including the artwork of families just like yours must have really connected with you? >> absolutely. i ended up being able to come along and recover my grandfather's collection of 3,000 prints, some of them are hanging in my apartment right now. >> reporter: this was rye of works stolen by the nazis have still never been f like rafael's portrait of a young man.
the community with leaders pushing towards charges for the officer. the lopez family has filed a civil lawsuit. check out your morning commute with leyla gulen right now. >> we have a stalled vehicle along 80. if you're traveling along the westbound direction at carlton boulevard, you will find it in the center lanes. major backups from highway 4. for drive time traffic we have high wind advisories for the bay bridge and san mateo bridge. but look at how long it's going to take you on the golden gate headed from the tunnels into san francisco, 16 minutes, kristen. >> leyla, >>> a winter weather advisory for lake tahoe. up to four inches of snow expected by this afternoon. our highs today for the bay area, mid to upper 50s. my accuweather seven-day forecast, chill overnight with freeze warnings that will exte ♪ >>> you're looking at the amazing britney spears. a friend of this show, by the way. her music video, the latest smash single. and today is a huge day for britney fans everywhere. the album is finally out. it's called "britney jean," her eighth studio album. and we were with britney, f
of civil war in 2005. he denied there was any rift with his deputy. we have more from the sudanese capital. what has happened is a senior generalwho is a right hand man of the president has replaced him. it's important how the government sees it's need to maintain power it's a form of co-oco-opting him into power. it's kind of secured it in that sense. it's not clear how even if there are new faces in the government with the same old policies whether or not it will make a difference to being able to han handle the economic crisis this country faces. that is eric martin in car to k. >>> the u.s. says he is a war veteran. glorchlts th-9dthe saga for for. >> when merl newman made the trip to south korea he wouldn't know how difficult it b it wouln out. he is now back in the u.s. beside his wife with a message. >> it was a great homecoming and i'm tired and i'm with my family now. thank you all for the support we got and very much appreciate it. >> newman was a soldier in the korean war and his visit was a long planned vacation down memory lane. he was no orland ordinary soldi. the south korea
human rights first. he'll talk about balancing national security and civil liberties. that starts at 1:15 eastern here on c-span2. >> i didn't get the idea for the dummies series. i had an idea to do a beginning book about computers, about it specifically. i kind of inspired myself to do that u just daling with people in the magazine editing job i had had. being on the radio at that time. and being out in the public and talking to people about computers. it was obviously that people wanted to learn more but that the material we had available at the time just wasn't doing the job. we had beginner box on how to use computers. but they sucked. they just didn't have that, you know, they were condescending. they were pate nice. the author was arrogant. well, you'll never get the stuff anyway or iowa, look, this is cool. people didn't want to know that. they wanted to use a computer. they planned to publish one book, and even then there was some reluctancy with the title when the owner found out they had this book. he's like you can't offend the reader. cancel that book. and unfortunately, w
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